Mosquito-Borne Diseases

Mosquito-Borne Diseases

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Know the Buzz about mosquito bites. Oakland County Residents are urged to follow prevention tips to protect themselves from mosquito-borne diseases. The best way to prevent diseases spread by mosquitoes is to avoid being bitten. 

Follow these tips to protect you and your family:

1. Prevent mosquito bites

The best way to prevent diseases spread by mosquitoes is to avoid being bitten. The following can help protect you and your family from mosquito bites:

  • Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellant. All EPA-registered insect repellants are evaluated for safety and effectiveness.
  • Always follow the product label instructions.
  • Do not use insect repellant on babies younger than 2 months of age.
  • Do not apply insect repellant on a child's hands, eyes, mouth, cut or irritated skin.
  • Adults: spray insect repellant on your hands and then apply to a child's face.
  • Wear protective clothing such as long-sleeved shirts and pants.
  • Avoid areas where mosquitoes may be present, including indoor areas

2. Control mosquitoes at home

  • Maintain window and door screens to keep mosquitoes out of buildings. Do not prop open doors.
  • Get rid of mosquito breeding sites by removing standing water in and around your home:
    • Once a week, empty and scrub, turn over, cover, or throw out items that hold water, such as tires, buckets, planters, toys, pools, birdbaths, flowerpots, roof gutters, or trash containers. 

3. Prevent the spread of disease

Mosquito-borne diseasesare those spread by the bite of an infected mosquito.  Some diseases that are spread by mosquitoes include Zika virus, West Nile virus, etc., St. Louis Encephalitis (SLE), Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE), and LaCrosse (LAC) virus.

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Zika,

Zika is a disease caused by the Zika virus that is spread to people mainly from the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. Zika virus can also spread from a pregnant mother to her baby during pregnancy or around the time of birth. It can also spread during sex with a person who has Zike to his or her sex partners. About one in five people infected with Zika will get sick.  The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting for several days to one week.  Most people will not realize they have been infected. Click here for more information on Zika.

West Nile,

West Nile Virus (WNV) is a potentially serious illness. Experts believe it is established as a seasonal epidemic in North America that flares up in the summer and continues into the fall.  It can infect humans, birds, horses and some other mammals.  In a small number of people infected by the virus, the disease can be serious, even fatal. Click here for more information on WNV.

St. Louis Encephalitis ,

Saint Louis Encephalitis virus (SLEV) is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito. Most cases of SLEV disease have occurred in eastern and central states.  Most persons infected with SLEV have no apparent illness. Click here for more information on SLEV.

Eastern Equine Encephalitis ,

Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) is a rare virus that can cause swelling of the brain. The disease is found in both horses and people. In a small percentage of people, the disease can be serious, even fatal. Click here for more information about EEE.

La Crosse Encephalitis,

La Crosse encephalitis virus (LACV) is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito. Most cases of LACV disease occur in the upper Midwestern and mid-Atlantic and southeastern states. Many people infected with LACV have no apparent symptoms. Click here for more information about LACV.