FAQ

Text OAKGOV COVID to 468311 to subscribe to receive COVID-19 updates
Help Hotline: Residents with non-health calls should call 248-858-2110

 Mask Questions / Emer. Health Order 2021-1

General statement about Health Order
Per Oakland County Emergency Health Order, masks are required to be worn by all students, teachers, administrative staff, attendees, volunteers, and other employees or volunteers in all kindergarten through grade twelve schools regardless of vaccination status. Read the full order.

 Executive Town Halls

​Oakland County Executive David Coulter has conducted a series of telephone town hall meetings with more than 10,000 Oakland County residents. The questions below were answered during one of those calls. Listen to the recorded meetings here.

If you have additional questions about the coronavirus or what Oakland County is doing to prevent its spread and keep you safe and you don’t see it answered here, call (248) 858-1000 and we’ll get you the answer


(Español | 中文)

Coronavirus Disease 2019, or COVID-19, is the disease caused by the respiratory virus SARS-CoV-2.

The virus spreads mainly from person to person, when an infected person breathes out droplets and very small particles that contain the virus. These droplets and particles can be breathed in by other people or land on their eyes, noses, or mouth. People who are closer than 6 feet from the infected person are most likely to get infected.

It may also be possible for a person to be infected with COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or eyes.

People diagnosed with COVID-19 have reported mild to severe respiratory illness 2 to 14 days after exposure. Symptoms include:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

There are steps you can take to protect yourself and others from being infected with COVID-19, including receiving a safe and effective vaccine. Vaccines for COVID-19 are available to everyone 12 years of age and over.



Although antibodies might provide some immunity to reinfection of the COVID-19 virus, there's currently not enough evidence to know how long these antibodies last or whether past infection with the virus protects you from getting another infection. Studies on COVID-19 antibodies are ongoing to learn more about immunity.

Anyone can get COVID-19. However, there are groups of people who are at greater risk for severe illness and complications from COVID-19:

  • Those over the age of 65
  • Women who are pregnant
  • Current and former smokers
  • People living with underlying health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease (including hypertension), chronic lung disease (asthma, COPD, emphysema, etc.) kidney disease, liver disease, Down Syndrome, cerebrovascular disease (stroke, etc.), and hemoglobin blood disorders (sickle cell disease, thalassemia)
  • People living with conditions that lead to being immunocompromised (cancer, HIV, solid organ or blood stem cell transplant, etc.)
  • People who are obese
  • People living with a substance use disorder

If you are in a high-risk group, you should get vaccinated and take extra precautions to avoid being infected with COVID-19.  




Getting vaccinated is the most effective way to reduce your risk of getting sick with COVID-19. 

You can also reduce your risk of getting COVID-19 by:

  • Wearing a face covering in public settings and when around people who don't live in your household, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.
  • Practicing social distancing, keeping 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don't live in your household.  Remember that some people without symptoms may be able to spread the virus.
  • Washing your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after you have been in a public place. When soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.


For more information on COVID-19 testing click here
Oakland County has set up a Help Hotline to assist residents with non-health related questions. We are happy to answer any questions or connect you with community resources such as food or housing assistance. The Help Hotline is open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., and can be reached by calling 248-858-1000, emailing hotline@oakgov.com, or texting OAKGOV COVID to 468311.


Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus.

The app sends an anonymous notification to users that have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 that is also using the app.  The more users with this app, the more effective it will be.

If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you may have received a false negative result.  You should isolate away from others and contact your healthcare provider about your symptoms, especially if they worsen, about follow-up testing.

If you do not have symptoms of COVID-19, but you are not fully vaccinated and were exposed to a person with COVID-19, you may still become sick.  Self-quarantine at home for 14 days after your exposure and monitor for symptoms.  


If you are fully vaccinated (2 weeks after your second dose in a 2-dose series, such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as Johnson & Johnson's Janssen vaccine) you do not need to stay away from someone who has COVID-19. You should, however, get tested if you experience any symptoms after the exposure. 

If you are not fully vaccinated, you should stay away for at least 10 days since symptoms first appeared (or since the positive test, if there are no symptoms), and

  • at least 24 hours with no fever without fever-reducing medication and
  • other symptoms of COVID-19 are improving

More information about quarantine and isolation can be found by clicking here


​For more information on COVID-19 Vaccines click here.

f symptoms worsen and/or do not respond to allergy treatments, It may be coronavirus. For any medical issue, it is best to contact your health care provider to determine the best treatment.

If you have symptoms of COVID-19, you may have received a false negative result.  You should isolate away from others and contact your healthcare provider about your symptoms, especially if they worsen, about follow-up testing.

If you do not have symptoms of COVID-19, but you are not fully vaccinated and were exposed to a person with COVID-19, you may still become sick.  Self-quarantine at home for 14 days after your exposure and monitor for symptoms.  


Get vaccinated. COVID-19 vaccines are effective at protecting you from getting sick. People who have been fully vaccinated can resume activities they did prior to the pandemic. 

If you are not fully vaccinated (2 weeks after your second dose in a 2-dose series, such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as Johnson & Johnson's Janssen vaccine) you should continue to take precautions, including:

  • Wearing a mask over your nose and mouth
  • Maintaining 6 feet of distance between yourself and others who don't live with you
  • Avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated indoor spaces
  • Washing your hands often

Get vaccinated. COVID-19 vaccines are effective at protecting you from getting sick. People who have been fully vaccinated can resume activities they did prior to the pandemic. 

If you are not fully vaccinated (2 weeks after your second dose in a 2-dose series, such as the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, or 2 weeks after a single-dose vaccine, such as Johnson & Johnson's Janssen vaccine), practice social distancing by staying at least six feet away when you can. Be aware of the commonly touched surfaces and clean them often as well as washing your hands. Use separate bathrooms if you can.


Meals on Wheels has a long history of providing healthy, nutritious and safe meals. It’s vitally important to maintain a healthy diet.
Oakland County has set up a Help Hotline to assist residents with non-health related questions. We are happy to answer any questions or connect you with community resources such as food or housing assistance. The Help Hotline is open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., and can be reached by calling 248-858-1000, emailing hotline@oakgov.com, or texting OAKGOV COVID to 468311.


Parents should have age appropriate conversations with children and teens about changes in their lives because of COVID-19 and allow opportunities for their kids to share their feelings about the pandemic. Parents can also create a routine for their kids that allows for some flexibility. One of the best things parents can do for their kids is to model healthy coping behaviors. If a parent is worried about their child’s mental health, they can contact their primary care provider or  Oakland Schools has put together resources that may help parents navigating the pandemic with school-aged children.

You can follow these five action steps to help someone who may be having thoughts of suicide: 


  1. Ask directly if they are thinking of suicide. “Are you thinking about suicide?” “Are you thinking about killing yourself?” Studies show that asking directly about suicide does not put the idea in someone’s head. 
  2. Be there for them whether it’s being physically present with them or listening over the phone. 
  3. Keep them safe. It’s important to establish immediate safety. Ensure they hadn’t taken steps to end their life before talking to you. Ask if they have a weapon they had planned to use in order to find a way to safely disable their plan. 
  4. Help them connect with resources that can help increase their safety. If you need crisis counseling, call or text Common Ground’s 24-hour helpline at 1-800-231-1127. 
  5. Follow up. Be sure to contact them after your initial conversation, and after you’ve connected them to resources. Continue to offer support on an ongoing basis, if possible. Give them local and national crisis line information. 


When the Oakland County Health Division receives positive test results they are in touch with the patient and trace back all potential exposures. They provide guidance to individuals or groups of individuals that may have come in close contact with the patient. In the early days of the virus we also provided a list of potential public exposure sites. It is now evident this virus is broadly in our community, so everyone needs to follow the strict guidelines about avoiding public spaces and following the strict hygiene practices no matter where you live. In addition, if you feel sick or are experiencing the symptoms of cough, fever or shortness of breath, stay home and contact your doctor or our Nurse on Call at 1-800-848-5533.
For a complete list of county services and programs operating, contact the Oakland County hotline at 248-858-1000.  Services available through the Oakland County Health division can be found here or by calling 248-858-1280. Health-related questions can be answered by calling Nurse on Call at 1-800-848-5533.
We cannot explain why one community has more cases than another. We know a part of it has to do with access to testing. It can be an indication of general access to health care insurance or a true measure of what is happening in the community. No matter where you live, stay at home and take precautions to protect yourself, your family and other residents, especially if you must go out.
Please call 248-858-2110 if you have additional questions.